The Lord is close to the brokenhearted
    and saves those who are crushed in spirit. Psalm 34:18

We offer hope and dignity, not dependency and shame.

 

 

 

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Clean Socks Hope, Inc. is a 501 (c)(3) nonprofit. All donations are tax deductible if allowed by law © 2016

Solutions for Complex Problems

The Midtown community of New Albany, Indiana has no local grocery or department store and its lack of transportation issues causes our neighbors to walk or ride their bike past acres of alcohol, lottery tickets and processed food options. This is an open invitation to crime, drugs and sex trafficking.

God’s 10 Year Plan

Our goal is to designate a 10-year master plan and when that community is up and thriving, move to the adjacent or to the next neighborhood in need and replicate the process. We partner with the under-served neighborhoods beginning with its residents, then its churches, nonprofits and businesses and finally local government to provide innovative and holistic development that produces flourishing communities where God’s peace is present.

When Our Helping Hurts

We believe that God created all people, including the poor with the ability to help themselves and others. That means that we do not fall into the routine perpetual feeding and clothing programs of those around us, but equip those we serve with the skills that will create self-worth and self-sufficiency that can change the lives of men, women and children for generations to come.

Families being Served with Dignity

Thanks to our partnership with Northside Christian Church and its Outreach Ministry Midtown Commons we have be able to serve 1,830 families to date, provide 8,442 healthy meals via Dare to Care, 6,858 conversations over coffee and over 1,100 showers providing dignity in a neighborhood that needs it and Jesus the most.

Social Issues

Addressing poverty is extremely complex because there are so many interrelated issues. There are sixteen areas of life that must be considered when helping people living in poverty. The sixteen areas of life are: spiritual needs, addiction, crime, employment, education, financial, healthcare, housing, identification, immigration, legal issues, possessions, recreation, relationships, security, and transportation. Each individual must be assessed to determine what assistance they need in the crucial areas of life.

"Our life in Midtown.."

    Lee Lee Being present, consistent and having High expectations is our way of life. The Midtown Spirit Cultural Center and Life Learning Lab would also become the permanent home of the Christmas store and we could generate income by housing teen ministry Redeem the Dream’s first corporate office and the official launch pad for fellow NGO Mercy’s Edge. Redeem the Dream provides grade 8—12 ministry and Mercy’s Edge provides the prison ministry and 80 jobs for our Perp to Patron ministry (Steve Cox). We would also use the building to teach life skills from kinder-gardeners to retirees.
    MikeOur friends Chris Bobay and Mike Rich has been tasked to take the Urban Academy/Mission piece and continue to grow and facilitate the Alan Hirsch/Jeff Vandestelt model of a movement by educating every church in Midtown, New Albany, Floyd, Clark, Harrison and all sites beyond. Mike can spearhead all things real estate and Chris all things Hirsh-e-stelt missionally and that with the Midtown Missional Community allows a biblical way to raise family and specifically, allow God’s calling to connect the Church missionally to the poor and the poor to the Church.  
    Hope on MissionWhat does dignity look like? For us, and the Outreach Ministry, Midtown Commons we have be able to serve 1,830 families to date, provide 8,442 healthy meals via our incredible collaborative Food Bank  Dare to Care, we've had 6,858 conversations over coffee and over 1,100 showers providing dignity in a neighborhood that needs it and Jesus the most. This "community," has help 13 street homeless go from the street, to getting their identifications to getting medical insurance, a stable job and a place to call home.  

    Latest post

       
    • But, you’re our Pastor

      “But, you’re our Pastor,” my wife frequently reminds Preston when we are at Midtown Commons. For her, it’s a title he has earned during our 5 plus year tenure at Northside’s Outreach... Read more

    Abby at Bearno's

    "To be poor is to be marginalized, isolated from mainstream society, excluded from what privileges and advantages available to the rest of culture. When people become isolated and devalued by society, their dignity diminishes; their self-worth erodes."

    ~Bob Lupton | Charity Detox

    Isolation

    Isolation in the inner cities or in rural communities more often than not mean substandard education, a severe lack of viable job opportunities and an almost total absence of upwardly mobile neighbors. Poor communities everywhere are universally plagued by exploitive businesses and a relentless, deadly undertow of criminal influences.

    Hard Work

    "When hard work yields only continued poverty, a person understandably abandons his or her ambition; a work ethic loses meaning. And when the pressures of survival take precedence over the motivation to achieve hope begins to fade. Resignation is inevitable and the spirit of poverty takes root." ~Bob Lupton

    Bob Lupton

    In 2012, Bob Lupton shared this philosophy to 50 mostly middle class people at a Focused Community Strategies Open House and then the founder of the GA. Avenue Food Co-op, Chad Hale got up and said in his best southern drawl, “Middle class white folk think they know what’s best for everyone; and the people you are serving hate you for it.”

    A Turning Point

    When I returned to my hotel that night I knew they were talking directly to me. As soon as we got back home I held a board meeting and we threw out everything we thought we knew about working with the poor in an urban setting and began this long journey to stop offering demeaning handouts, but partner with those in need relationally. In other words, our partner families have skin in the game equal to the benefits they receive.

    Community Foundation of Southern Indiana

    Thanks to a Community Catalyst Grant from the Community Foundation, we are starting first very simply by adding raised beds and a greenhouse to our already thriving community garden. Last year, as part of our low income food cooperative the community provided itself 8,442 meals in 2015.

    Our Garden

    Our garden provided fresh tomatoes, lettuce, carrots and kale and dozens of herbs for 6 months of that 12-month period. Every dollar spent provided 11 meals and the monthly average was about 704. But we’re not stopping there.

    The Christmas Store:

    Clean Socks Hope has run its Christmas Store programming in partnership with Northside Christian Church and Midtown Commons since 2012. That impact has seen a total of 162 families (including 14 Hispanic families for 2015); 167 adults and 474 children.

    The EMPWR Coat:

    Clean Socks Hope began this program in 2015 and is the ONLY southern Indiana nonprofit to offer these lifesaving coats to the street homeless. We donated 14 EMPWR Coats (manufactured in Detroit by former homeless women that convert into sleeping bags) valued at $1,400 to our street homeless brothers and sisters.  

    The Midtown Neighborhood Network:

     A low income food cooperative which began its humble roots on July 5, 2012 with 6 families. To date, its impact has seen over 100 families participate in the Midtown Neighborhood Network Food Cooperative for a total impact of 2,184 from our community.

    Sock Talks:

    Executive Director Jeffrey S. Minton and Midtown Pastor Preston Searcy has been asked by dozens of organizations to share their expertise on homelessness and our Toxic Charity philosophies based upon our wildly successful “Anti-shelter” policies. Because of our work in Midtown it's been shared with Indiana Governor Mike Pence.

    Outreach:

    We became an outreach, a mission, a ministry, a church and finally to Alan Hirsch’s delight we are a MOVEMENT! The Midtown Spirit Center will hopefully grow the low income food co-op to 10 units and resetting the table in the city of the greatest need right in the middle of the land of plenty.

    Clean Socks to the Homeless:

    Since 2007, Clean Socks Hope has donated socks to the street homeless, jails, prisons and natural disasters to the tune of over 10,000 pair. Clean Socks Hope has been awarded over $25,000 from various agencies for its sock equals dignity philanthropy.

    Contact Us

    HOURS | INFO

    We’re the only southern Indiana nonprofit offering the EMPWR Coat. Be a $100 sponsor to purchase the EMPWR Coat (it converts into a sleeping bag for the street homeless) in our community. Donate at cleansockshope.org today. E-mail us at: | mail@cleansockshope.org

     

    “For though by this time you ought to be teachers, you need someone to teach you again the basic principles of the oracles of God. You need milk, not solid food, for everyone who lives on milk is unskilled in the word of righteousness, since he is a child. But solid food is for the mature, for those who have their powers of discernment trained by constant practice to distinguish good from evil.” ~Hebrews 5:12-14

     “And when you pray, you must not be like the hypocrites. For they love to stand and pray in the synagogues and at the street corners, that they may be seen by others. Truly, I say to you, they have received their reward. But when you pray, go into your room and shut the door and pray to your Father who is in secret. And your Father who sees in secret will reward you.” ~Matthew 6:5-6

    “And by this we know that we have come to know him, if we keep his commandments. Whoever says “I know him” but does not keep his commandments is a liar, and the truth is not in him, but whoever keeps his word, in him truly the love of God is perfected. By this we may know that we are in him: whoever says he abides in him ought to walk in the same way in which he walked.” ~1 John 2:3-6

    The Face of Homelessness

    So what does the face of homelessness look like? It doesn’t. For most people the face of homelessness is that stereotypical action shot of the panhandler on the side of the road or the pitiful looking man in dirty and tattered clothes, intoxicated or drugged out or both looking just gross enough to make your traditional church goer or civic minded millennial uncomfortable enough to donate. But in reality, the face of homelessness is hard working families who have had a catastrophic event in their lives or caught in a cycle of poverty via slumlords, food deserts and high crime and unemployment. With heroin in America at epidemic proportions, we are seeing it in EVERY neighborhood.

    Real Life

    Showers to Society Program: For the last 5+ years, we’ve offered showers to the marginalized, those isolated from mainstream society, excluded from what privileges and advantages available to the rest of culture. Thanks to that dignity offering program we have seen dozens of street homeless families go from the streets to employed, sheltered and paying it forward.

    Perception

    Perception is reality; except when it’s not. After Hours Mentor Program: A program that began organically and started by volunteers Steve and Debby Geldhaus and Mike Wadsworth is a simple benevolence program where volunteers in the area swing by Midtown Commons during off hours and check in on our street homeless during the extreme weather conditions. Offering Gatorade in the summer or wool socks in the winter this team of dedicated volunteers have grown to love this incredible group of men and women and offering their time to the broken and the broken hearted.

    Urban Academy

    The Midtown Spirit Life Lab and Learning Center: Over the next months, our goal is to raise enough money for Phase 1 of the Midtown Spirit Cultural and Urban Center which will house the Midtown Urban Academy. The Academy will be dedicated to a lifetime of learning for under-served communities. Impact Partners: City of New Albany.

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